‘I know this great little place’

Despite being a native to the city of Brisbane I believe my seven years away qualify me as a newbie, especially as its boundaries and spaces seem to have moved and continue to move at such a rapid pace.  Despite this and because of my dubious reputation as a ‘foodie in the know’ I am frequently asked where is a good place to eat?

Now it turns out this might not be so much because of any reputation but more so because, research has shown, that it’s what we Australians do. We like to hear a personal recommendation ‘from the horse's mouth.’

Research carried out in 2011 by Roy Morgan revealed advice on where to eat out was the second most discussed topic amongst the 18, 851 sample group. 61 per cent people had either sought advice, provided advice or both. So it seems I am not part of some exclusive group of informed and valued advice givers, it’s just that Australians ask everyone. So disappointing. Saying that, I guess part of it is the quality of advice you give.

I like to be the person people ask but when it comes to the delivery of said information it gets more complicated.  One has to take into account the inquirers likes/dislikes/ability to spend money and what I like to call, their complainability rating. Otherwise understood as ‘how much do they whinge?’

There is a couple in my acquaintance, that although I thoroughly enjoy their company and conversation, I know are nit-pickers and serial complainers. Some may call them perfectionists but, really, life isn’t perfect so why should there be a little bubble of perfection when you enter a café or restaurant? Don’t get me wrong, venues should strive to do their utmost to win your cash but this couple’s ability to complain is incomparable.

Now for them, there will be a snowflake’s chance in hell that I will name or take them to my favourite place to eat. This is purely for the fear that they will visit, not enjoy the experience and consequently shoot it down in flames in my presence. So you see this whole equation is far more complex. In future when I seek advice it may just do me well to reflect on how this person views my behaviour in light of any answer they give.

Overall the survey tells us that by degrees “Australians tend to be more ‘info seekers’ than ‘trusted advisors’” so I guess there is room to move.

[end note] among the other riveting topics of discussion were purchasing cars, home entertainment or electronics, mobile phones, internet providers, finance and investments, home renovations and health and nutrition. Perhaps we just need to find more interesting conversations?